Get more motivation through gameplay with Fitbit

November 22, 2012

With the current trend for Gamification and Gamified systems in today’s digital landscape, there’s now plenty of interesting examples to look to for both inspiration and to measure effectiveness.

Companies utilising these positive, motivational shaping techniques are aiming to generate greater levels of engagement with their customers through the ‘simple’ use of fun.

But what’s interesting about these emerging systems is how complicated ‘simple’ fun actually is to get off the ground. A fine line must be trod between the wishes of the customer to have a sense of autonomy and self determination, and the needs of the company to develop a system that has a commercially beneficial outcome.

It turns out that fun can be engineered, a process for gameplay can be designed, and real benefits can be achieved by both customer and company.

By baking in both extrinsic and intrinsic motivational drivers, and by structuring a system around key game dynamics, mechanics and components, highly effective gamified systems can be developed that will keep customers healthily hooked on a brand experience, as well as helping companies develop greater customer engagement and brand share.

Perhaps one of the more obvious places to find gamification is in the health and fitness sector. A sector where classically us ‘players’ are, in the main, de-motivated and require a sizeable shove to change our behaviour.

Ever since Nike cracked it with Nike+, the sector has seen a healthy nod towards the principals of gamification, and there is today several dedicated gamified systems wholly focused on bringing about positive change through motivational gameplay.

A new player in the market and rival to Nike+ is Fitbit.

Fitbit goes beyond simple running (Nike+), and looks to affect the ‘player’s’ total body. With sections including Get Fit, Eat Better, Weight Management and Sleep Better, Fifbit is using several tried and tested techniques, such as goal setting, points and badges, to drive behaviour change, generate engagement and sell product.

The system, visually designed by Odopod, looks fresh, interesting and healthily addictive. The benefits of a set of physical products supported by this digital ecosystem, as well as the ‘total body’ emphasis certainly helps the system to stand out (from the big tick), and shapes it up as a premier player in the gamification league.

Check it out, does it make you feel a little more motivated?

by____ Gavin Johnson